Tag Archives: Thesis

Just for Newbies! Installing Thesis 1.6 for the First Time

Installing Thesis 1.6 may look like a difficult task — all that copying, the file permissions, the renaming.

But it doesn’t have to be that way!

A new article just posted, “Installing Thesis 1.6 for the First Time” has all the help you need to install Thesis 1.6 quickly and easily. It has step-by-step directions and lots of illustrations to help you plunge into the thorn-patch and emerge unscathed!

Coming up next: Upgrading to Thesis 1.6

Installing Thesis 1.6 for the First Time

Installing Thesis 1.6 for the first time can be a daunting task, especially if you have little experience with WordPress, FTP programs, or file permissions. But setting up Thesis is not hard, and this guide offers step-by-step instructions to installation along with plenty of illustrations to help you. The tutorial follows the standard Thesis 1.6 installation process.

Before you start the installation

1. Make sure WordPress is installed on your server. This may sound silly, but there are more than a few support requests on the forum where the user has not installed WordPress yet.
2. Download the Thesis zip file from DIYthemes and unzip it on your computer. There will be a Thesis_16 folder after you do so.
3. Be sure you know how to change file permissions. If you’re uncertain, read the article “How to Change File and Folder Permissions.
4. Make sure you know how to upload files. If you use an FTP program on your computer, usually you can just drag the folder from your computer onto the proper place in your FTP program and drop it. If you are using cPanel or a similar host program, refer to “File Management Using cPanel.”

If you haven’t thought about an FTP program for your computer yet, maybe it’s time to do so. Check out the articles “FTP Programs and Text Editors for Windows Users” or “FTP Programs and Text Editors for the Mac” for free FTP and editor programs. They will make file operations and customization a lot easier.

5. Read all the instructions below before you start.

Now, for the DIYthemes instructions and my comments:

1. Upload the new Thesis 1.6 folder to your /wp-content/themes folder.

Figure 1: The /wp-content and /themes folders
Figure 1: The /wp-content and /themes folders

1. Locate the /wp-content folder in your root directory. Inside it will be a folder called /themes. The folder structure will look like Figure 1.
2. Upload the entire Thesis_16 folder you unzipped on your computer to the /themes folder. Do not upload individual files!

Figure 2: Thesis has been uploaded to the /themes folder
Figure 2: Thesis has been uploaded to the /themes folder

3. When you are finished, you will see the /thesis_16 folder within the /themes folder, as in Figure 2.

2. Locate the /custom-sample folder and change its name to /custom.

Figure 3: Thesis custom-sample folder before renaming
Figure 3: Thesis custom-sample folder before renaming

1. Open your /thesis_16 folder and locate the /custom-sample folder within it. It will look like figure 3.

Figure 4: The Thesis folder with the custom-sample folder renamed to custom
Figure 4: The Thesis folder with the custom-sample folder renamed to custom

2. Rename the folder “custom.” When you are done, your Thesis folder should look like Figure 4.

3. Locate the layout.css file inside your newly-renamed /custom folder, and change its permissions to 666

Figure 5: The custom folder's contents
Figure 5: The custom folder's contents

1. Find the layout.css file within your /thesis_16/custom folder and highlight it.

Figure 6: The layout.css file and the file dialog
Figure 6: The layout.css file and the file dialog

2. Most FTP programs allow you to right-click on the file to bring up a dialog similar to the one in Figure 6. Choose “Get Info,” “File Properties,” or similar wording. Refer to the cPanel article mentioned above if you are using that program.

Figure 7: Changing the file permissions on layout.css
Figure 7: Changing the file permissions on layout.css

1. A file properties dialog will pop up. Choose “Permissions” or similar wording.
2. If there is a box that you can enter the file permission numbers, enter 666. If not, set file permissions to Owner: Read, Write; Group: Read, Write; and Others: Read, Write. “Owner,” “Group,” and “Others” may be worded differently, but they will be close enough to figure out.
3. Click the “Apply,” “Save,” “OK” or similar button to save your changes.

4. Change the permissions of your /custom/cache folder to 775.

The full instructions read,

[optional but highly recommended] If you’d like to give Thesis the ability to auto-crop thumbnail images for you, then you’ll want to change the permissions of your /custom/cache folder to 775.

Trust me, you will want to have Thesis to do this for you, so you need to change the permissions!

1. Locate the /cache folder. Open up your /custom folder.The /cache folder is within the /custom folder within your /thesis_16 folder as shown in Figure 5.

Figure 8: Changing the file permissions on the /cache folder
Figure 8: Changing the file permissions on the /cache folder

2. Use the same procedure you did when changing the layout.css file’s permissions: Highlight the /cache folder, right-click on it, and get to the “Permissions” panel in the file dialog.

If there is a box that you can enter the file permission numbers, enter 775. If not, set file permissions to Owner: Read, Write, Execute; Group: Read, Write, Execute; and Others: Read, Write, Execute. “Owner,” “Group,” and “Others” may be worded differently, but they will be close enough to figure out.

3. Click the “Apply,” “Save,” “OK” or similar button to save your changes.

5. Inside your WordPress dashboard, go to Appearance -> Themes, and then activate Thesis 1.6.

1. To get to your Administration panel, type “your-domain-name/wp-admin” in your browser. For example, I type in the following to get to the Thesis Theme Tools Admin panel:

thesisthemetools.com/wp-admin

2. In the menu on the left in your Administration panel click on “Appearance,” then on “Themes”

Figure 9: The themes panel with the Thesis 1.6 theme
Figure 9: The themes panel with the Thesis 1.6 theme

3. Click on the Thesis 1.6 theme image shown in Figure 9. You will be taken to a simulation of how it will look (but believe me, it never looks right!). Click on “Activate Theme” in the upper right corner to make Thesis 1.6 the active theme.

Figure 10: The Thesis 1.6 Options panel
Figure 10: The Thesis 1.6 Options panel

4. You will be taken to the Thesis Options panel, as shown in Figure 10.

6. You’re done!

The full instruction reads,

You’re done, but make sure you check out both the Thesis Options and Design Options pages that now exist inside your WordPress Dashboard. You’ll be able to do things like set up your navigation menu, set fonts and font sizes, select your layout, and much, much more. To put it simply, this is the part of Thesis you don’t want to miss!

Now it’s time to see your blog in Thesis 1.6 for the first time! It will be the spartan look of the fresh install, but you will change that, won’t you?

I hope these instructions have been clear and helpful. Feel free to make a comment, or if you want to email me, click on the “Contact” button in the nav bar.

©2009 Michael L Nichols. All rights reserved.

What next?

Your comments are always welcome, and are important to this blog’s community! Leave a comment now, or read the comments.

You can find several related articles in the “Related Articles” list below. In the footer you will find a lists of Popular Posts, Recent Posts, and you may browse by Categories, or tags. There’s also a Google Custom Search box to help you find just what you want.

Get free updates by RSS or email!

If you have enjoyed this article, please consider subscribing to article updates, using an RSS reader, or by email. It’s free and is a great way to make sure you don’t miss a single article! I also invite you to follow me on Twitter!

Why not share this article with others!

Share this article with your friends using your favorite social media service, such as StumbleUpon, or Digg. Check out the icons below under “Share This Article With Others” for other social media, including del.icio.us, Technorati, Sphinn, Friendfeed, FaceBook, MySpace andLinkedIn! You can also email or print the article, and even tweet it using Twitter!

New Tip! Upgrade-Proof Your Site with the bloginfo() Tag

Thesis has the reputation of being upgrade-proof. That is, you do not lose your work in the custom folder when you upgrade.

Running against this is the necessity of putting full URL paths to images and files in the custom_functions.php file. If you use a lot of images from your /custom/images folder, it can be a real pain going through the file updating the URLs.

But you really don’t have to do that — not if you use the WordPress bloginfo() tag!

The article Upgrade-Proof Your Site with the bloginfo() Tag in the “Tips” section shows you how to use the tag to automatically put your Thesis path into URLs. That means that no matter what your Thesis folder is named, your URLs will always be up-to-date!

If you do a lot of work in the custom_functions.php file, this article is for you!

Upgrade-Proof Your Site with the bloginfo() Tag

Thesis has the reputation of being upgrade-proof. That is, you do not lose your work in the custom folder when you upgrade.

However, custom_functions.php and widgets require that you to enter the full file path to files and images. When you upgrade, you have to go back and change every full path to that of your new upgraded Thesis folder.

Or do you? Not if you use the WordPress tag bloginfo().

What is the bloginfo() tag?

We sometimes forget that WordPress has many functions and tags that are available for us to use, and bloginfo() is one of them.

The bloginfo() tag provides a great deal of information when used with its parameters, ranging from the title of the post or page, to the URL of the site’s feed. A full list of the parameters can be found on the WordPress Codex page for bloginfo().

The parameters we are looking at in this article are those that give you various file paths to your Thesis folder. The following list shows these, along with an example:

  • bloginfo(‘url’) = http://thesisthemetools.com
  • bloginfo(‘stylesheet_directory’) = http://thesisthemetools.com/wp-content/themes/thesis_151
  • bloginfo(‘stylesheet_url’) = http://thesisthemetools.com/wp-content/themes/thesis_151/style.css
  • bloginfo(‘template_directory’) = http://thesisthemetools.com/wp-content/themes/thesis_151
  • bloginfo(‘template_url’) = http://thesisthemetools.com/wp-content/themes/thesis_151

Note that none of the file paths have a trailing forward slash (/). Three of the parameters give essentially the same information: stylesheet_directory, template_directory, and template_url.

How to use bloginfo() in file paths

Essentially, you substitute the bloginfo() tag for the portion of the file path you want replaced. The basic syntax is:

	<?php bloginfo('PARAMETER'); ?>

For example, here is a full file path that might be used in custom_functions.php or a widget:

	<img src= "http://thesisthemetools.com/wp-content/themes/thesis_151/custom/images/icon-rss.gif" alt="RSS"/>

When I upgrade Thesis I would have to go back to my custom_functions.php file or widget and change this URL. But if I use bloginfo() with the “template_url” parameter, the new URL will be automatically picked up, like so:

	<img src= "<?php bloginfo('template_url'); ?>/custom/images/icon-rss.gif" alt="RSS"/>

The bloginfo() tag is a direct substitute for the file path. There is no need to put quotes around it.

Note that these examples have the PHP beginning and ending tags for use whenever PHP is not active. Of course, if PHP is active, you would leave them out.

How to use bloginfo() in widgets

Widgets can use bloginfo() too, but you have to have a plugin that provides PHP functionality in widgets. My favorite is Exec-PHP available from the WordPress plugins page or from the author’s plugin page.

All you have to do is download and activate the plugin and you have PHP functionality within your widgets (and posts, too). The method of using bloginfo() is the same as described above.

Conclusion

I encourage you to have a look at the bloginfo() page in the WordPress codex. The tag has many parameters that you can use to save you a lot of time and effort.

I hope this article has been helpful to you. Remember that your comments are always welcome, and that you can email me directly by clicking on the “Contact” button in the menu.

Two New Articles! Rotating Header Images and Upgrading Thesis

Today we continue to fill out our offering to you, gentle reader, with two great new articles:

Tutorial: Rotating Header Images” is found in the Tricks > Headers section. Rotating headers were a feature of Chris Pearson’s Cutline and Neoclassical themes. And now you can have them in Thesis! This easy-to-follow guide will have you up in no time. See them in action at my Thesis Demo site.

The latest addition to the Tips section is the detailed guide, “Upgrading Thesis.” Installing a Thesis upgrade can be a terrifying prospect for those of us who are less experienced. This article is the answer! Liberally sprinkled with illustrations, it takes you step-by-step through the Thesis upgrade process.

On tap are even more articles for you, such as how to install WordPress and tools for color schemes. Don’t turn that dial!

Upgrading Thesis

Upgrading Thesis can be a daunting task, especially if you have little experience with WordPress, FTP programs, or file permissions. But updating Thesis is not hard, and this guide offers step-by-step instructions along with plenty of illustrations to help you. The tutorial follows the standard Thesis upgrade process.

If you follow the instructions in this guide, after upgrading Thesis you will have two fully functioning installations of Thesis: the old one, and the newly upgraded one. This is a good thing. If anything goes wrong with the upgrade, you will have your old installation to fall back on. After you are sure the upgrade is working properly you can delete the old installation, if you wish.

Before you start the installation

1. Download the Thesis zip file from DIYthemes and unzip it on your computer. There will be a Thesis folder after you do so.
2. Be sure you know how to change file permissions. If you’re uncertain, read the article “How to Change File and Folder Permissions.
3. Make sure you know how to upload files. (I’m not being silly. There are a number of support questions in the Forum from upgraders who can’t upload files!) If you use an FTP program on your computer, usually you can just drag the folder from your computer onto the proper place in your FTP program and drop it. If you are using cPanel or a similar host program, refer to “File Management Using cPanel.”

If you haven’t thought about an FTP program for your computer yet, maybe it’s time to do so. Check out the articles “FTP Programs and Text Editors for Windows Users” or “FTP Programs and Text Editors for the Mac” for free FTP and editor programs. They will make file operations and customization a lot easier.

4. Read all the instructions below before you start.

Now, for the DIYthemes instructions and my comments:

1. Back up the /custom folder from your existing Thesis installation to your hard drive.

The full instruction states:

1. Back up the /custom folder from your existing Thesis installation to your hard drive. Also, if you’ve uploaded your own images to the /rotator folder, then you’ll want to back that up, too.

1. Create a folder on your computer to hold your /custom folder and /rotator folder.

2. Copy the entire /custom folder to your new computer folder. If you have your own images in the /rotator folder, copy it, too. Do not copy individual files!

2. Upload the new Thesis 1.5.1 folder to your /wp-content/themes folder.

Figure 1: The /wp-content and /themes folders
Figure 1: The /wp-content and /themes folders

1. Locate the /wp-content folder in your root directory. Inside it will be a folder called /themes. The folder structure will look like Figure 1.

2. Upload the entire Thesis folder you unzipped on your computer to the /themes folder. Do not upload individual files! There are many problems reported on the Thesis Support Forum where people have uploaded individual files instead of the entire Thesis folder. It just doesn’t work!

Figure 2: Thesis has been uploaded to the /themes folder
Figure 2: Thesis has been uploaded to the /themes folder

3. When you are finished, you will see the /Thesis folder within the /themes folder, as in Figure 2.

3. Copy the /custom folder you backed up in Step 1, and paste it into the new Thesis 1.5.1 folder.

Figure 3: Thesis custom folder has been renamed
Figure 3: Thesis custom folder has been copied

1. There will be a /custom-sample folder in the new Thesis folder you uploaded in step 2. Delete it, as it will not be needed.

2. Copy the entire /custom folder from your computer into the /thesis folder.

3. If you copied your /rotator folder to your computer in step 1, you have a choice how to proceed: You can delete the /rotator folder in the new Thesis installation, then copy the /rotator folder from your computer to the /thesis folder; or you may overwrite the new /rotator folder with the /rotator folder from your computer and deal with the error dialog. I recommend the first way, since there is no chance of corrupted or missing files.

Figure 4: The Thesis folder and all its files and folders
Figure 4: The Thesis folder and all its files and folders

When you are done, your Thesis folder should look like Figure 4. If it doesn’t, I recommend you delete it and start over.

4. Set the permissions of your new layout.css file (located in the root folder of Thesis 1.5.1) to 666.

Figure 5: The layout.css file and the file dialog
Figure 5: The layout.css file and the file dialog

1. Find the layout.css file within your /Thesis folder and highlight it.

2. Most FTP programs allow you to right-click on the file to bring up a dialog similar to the one in Figure 5. Choose “Get Info,” “File Properties,” or similar wording. Refer to the cPanel article mentioned above if you are using that program.

Figure 6: Changing the file permissions on layout.css
Figure 6: Changing the file permissions on layout.css

3. A file properties dialog will pop up like the one in Figure 6. Choose “Permissions” or similar wording.

4. If there is a box that you can enter the file permission numbers, enter 666. If not, set file permissions to Owner: Read, Write; Group: Read, Write; and Others: Read, Write. “Owner,” “Group,” and “Others” may be worded differently, but they will be close enough to figure out.

5. Click the “Apply,” “Save,” “OK” or similar button to save your changes.

5. Change the permissions of your /custom/cache folder to 775.

The full instructions read:

5. [optional] If you’d like to give Thesis the ability to auto-crop thumbnail images for you, then you’ll want to change the permissions of your /custom/cache folder to 775.

Trust me, you will want to have Thesis to do this for you, so you need to change the permissions!

Figure 7: Location of the /cache folder within the /custom folder
Figure 7: Location of the /cache folder within the /custom folder

1. Locate the /cache folder. Open up your /custom folder. The /cache folder is inside the /custom folder within your /Thesis folder as shown in Figure 7.

Figure 8: Changing the file permissions on the /cache folder
Figure 8: Changing the file permissions on the /cache folder

2. Use the same procedure you did when changing the layout.css file’s permissions: Highlight the /cache folder, right-click on it, and get to the “Permissions” panel in the file dialog.

3. If there is a box that you can enter the file permission numbers, enter 775. If not, set file permissions to Owner: Read, Write, Execute; Group: Read, Write, Execute; and Others: Read, Execute. Note that Others: Write will be the only option left unchosen. “Owner,” “Group,” and “Others” may be worded differently, but they will be close enough to figure out.

4. Click the “Apply,” “Save,” “OK” or similar button to save your changes.

6. Inside your WordPress dashboard, go to Appearance > Themes, and then activate Thesis 1.5.1.

1. To get to your Administration panel, type “your-domain-name/wp-admin” in your browser. For example, I type in the following to get to the Thesis Theme Tools Admin panel:

http://thesisthemetools.com/wp-admin

2. From your Administration panel click on “Appearance,” then on “Themes.”

Figure 9: The themes panel with the Thesis theme
Figure 9: The themes panel with the Thesis theme

3. Click on the Thesis theme image. You will be taken to a simulation of how it will look (but believe me, it never looks right!). Click on the button to make Thesis active.

4. You will be taken to the Thesis Options panel. Although it’s not strictly necessary, click on the “Big Ass Save” button at the bottom of the panel.

7. Visit the Design Options page and hit the Big Ass Save Button.

The full instruction reads:

7. Visit the Design Options page, ensure that Thesis is not giving you a warning about the file permissions on your layout.css file, and then hit the Big Ass Save Button.

1. From the Admin panel, click on Appearance > Design Options.

2. If you have not successfully changed the permissions on your layout.css file, you will get a warning about it. You must correct this to proceed.

3. Click the Big Ass Save button to complete the installation.

I hope these instructions have been clear and helpful. Feel free to make a comment, or if you want to email me, click on the “Contact” button in the nav bar.

©2009 Michael L Nichols. All rights reserved.

What next?

Your comments are always welcome, and are important to this blog’s community! Leave a comment now, or read the comments.

You can find several related articles in the “Related Articles” list below. In the footer you will find a lists of Popular Posts, Recent Posts, and you may browse by Categories, or tags. There’s also a Google Custom Search box to help you find just what you want.

Get free updates by RSS or email!

If you have enjoyed this article, please consider subscribing to article updates, using an RSS reader, or by email. It’s free and is a great way to make sure you don’t miss a single article! I also invite you to follow me on Twitter!

Why not share this article with others!

Share this article with your friends using your favorite social media service, such as StumbleUpon, or Digg. Check out the icons below under “Share This Article With Others” for other social media, including del.icio.us, Technorati, Sphinn, Friendfeed, FaceBook, MySpace andLinkedIn! You can also email or print the article, and even tweet it using Twitter!

Installing Thesis for the First Time

Installing Thesis for the first time can be a daunting task, especially if you have little experience with WordPress, FTP programs, or file permissions. But setting up Thesis is not hard, and this guide offers step-by-step instructions to installation, along with plenty of illustrations to help you. The tutorial follows the standard Thesis installation process.

Before you start the installation

1. Make sure WordPress is installed on your server. This may sound silly, but there are more than a few support requests on the forum where the user has not installed WordPress yet.

2. Download the Thesis zip file from DIYthemes and unzip it on your computer. There will be a Thesis folder after you do so.

3. Be sure you know how to change file permissions. If you’re uncertain, read the article “How to Change File and Folder Permissions.

4. Make sure you know how to upload files. If you use an FTP program on your computer, usually you can just drag the folder from your computer onto the proper place in your FTP program and drop it. If you are using cPanel or a similar host program, refer to “File Management Using cPanel.”

If you haven’t thought about an FTP program for your computer yet, maybe it’s time to do so. Check out the articles “FTP Programs and Text Editors for Windows Users” or “FTP Programs and Text Editors for the Mac” for free FTP and editor programs. They will make file operations and customization a lot easier.

5. Read all the instructions below before you start.

Now, for the DIYthemes instructions and my comments:

1. Upload the new Thesis 1.5.1 folder to your /wp-content/themes folder.

Figure 1: The /wp-content and /themes folders
Figure 1: The /wp-content and /themes folders

1. Locate the /wp-content folder in your root directory. Inside it will be a folder called /themes. The folder structure will look like Figure 1.

2. Upload the entire Thesis folder you unzipped on your computer to the /themes folder. Do not upload individual files!

Figure 2: Thesis has been uploaded to the /themes folder
Figure 2: Thesis has been uploaded to the /themes folder

3. When you are finished, you will see the /Thesis folder within the /themes folder, as in Figure 2.

2. Locate the /custom-sample folder and change its name to /custom.

Figure 3: Thesis custom folder has been renamed
Figure 3: Thesis custom folder has been renamed

1. Open your /Thesis folder and locate the /custom-sample folder within it.

2. Rename the folder “custom” as in Figure 3.

Figure 4: The Thesis folder and all its files and folders
Figure 4: The Thesis folder and all its files and folders

When you are done, your Thesis folder should look like Figure 4. If it doesn’t, I recommend you delete it and start over.

3. Locate the layout.css file, and change its permissions to 666.

Figure 5: The layout.css file and the file dialog
Figure 5: The layout.css file and the file dialog

1. Find the layout.css file within your /Thesis folder and highlight it.

2. Most FTP programs allow you to right-click on the file to bring up a dialog similar to the one in Figure 5. Choose “Get Info,” “File Properties,” or similar wording. Refer to the cPanel article mentioned above if you are using that program.

Figure 6: Changing the file permissions on layout.css
Figure 6: Changing the file permissions on layout.css

3. A file properties dialog will pop up like the one in Figure 6. Choose “Permissions” or similar wording.

4. If there is a box that you can enter the file permission numbers, enter 666. If not, set file permissions to Owner: Read, Write; Group: Read, Write; and Others: Read, Write. “Owner,” “Group,” and “Others” may be worded differently, but they will be close enough to figure out.

5. Click the “Apply,” “Save,” “OK” or similar button to save your changes.

4. Change the permissions of your /custom/cache folder to 775.

The full instructions read:

[optional] If you’d like to give Thesis the ability to auto-crop thumbnail images for you, then you’ll want to change the permissions of your /custom/cache folder to 775.

Trust me, you will want to have Thesis to do this for you, so you need to change the permissions!

Figure 7: Location of the /cache folder within the /custom folder
Figure 7: Location of the /cache folder within the /custom folder

1. Locate the /cache folder. Open up your /custom folder. The /cache folder is inside the /custom folder within your /Thesis folder as shown in Figure 7.

Figure 8: Changing the file permissions on the /cache folder
Figure 8: Changing the file permissions on the /cache folder

2. Use the same procedure you did when changing the layout.css file’s permissions: Highlight the /cache folder, right-click on it, and get to the “Permissions” panel in the file dialog.

3. If there is a box that you can enter the file permission numbers, enter 775. If not, set file permissions to Owner: Read, Write, Execute; Group: Read, Write, Execute; and Others: Read, Execute. Note that Others: Write will be the only option left unchosen. “Owner,” “Group,” and “Others” may be worded differently, but they will be close enough to figure out.

4. Click the “Apply,” “Save,” “OK” or similar button to save your changes.

5. Inside your WordPress dashboard, go to Appearance > Themes, and then activate Thesis.

1. To get to your Administration panel, type “your-domain-name/wp-admin” in your browser. For example, I type in the following to get to the Thesis Theme Tools Admin panel:

http://thesisthemetools.com/wp-admin

2. From your Administration panel click on “Appearance,” then on “Themes.”

Figure 9: The themes panel with the Thesis theme
Figure 9: The themes panel with the Thesis theme

3. Click on the Thesis theme image. You will be taken to a simulation of how it will look (but believe me, it never looks right!). Click on the button to make Thesis active.

4. You will be taken to the Thesis Options panel. Although it’s not strictly necessary, click on the “Big Ass Save” button at the bottom of the panel to complete the installation.

6. You’re done!

The full instruction reads,

You’re done, but make sure you check out both the Thesis Options and Design Options pages that now exist inside your WordPress Dashboard. You’ll be able to do things like set up your navigation menu, set fonts and font sizes, select your layout, and much, much more. To put it simply, this is the part of Thesis you don’t want to miss!

Now it’s time to see your blog in Thesis for the first time! It will be the spartan look of the fresh install, but you will change that, won’t you?

I hope these instructions have been clear and helpful. Feel free to make a comment, or if you want to email me, click on the “Contact” button in the nav bar.

©2009 Michael L Nichols. All rights reserved.

What next?

Your comments are always welcome, and are important to this blog’s community! Leave a comment now, or read the comments.

You can find several related articles in the “Related Articles” list below. In the footer you will find a lists of Popular Posts, Recent Posts, and you may browse by Categories, or tags. There’s also a Google Custom Search box to help you find just what you want.

Get free updates by RSS or email!

If you have enjoyed this article, please consider subscribing to article updates, using an RSS reader, or by email. It’s free and is a great way to make sure you don’t miss a single article! I also invite you to follow me on Twitter!

Why not share this article with others!

Share this article with your friends using your favorite social media service, such as StumbleUpon, or Digg. Check out the icons below under “Share This Article With Others” for other social media, including del.icio.us, Technorati, Sphinn, Friendfeed, FaceBook, MySpace andLinkedIn! You can also email or print the article, and even tweet it using Twitter!

Google Analytics Setup

Google Analytics, a free service of Google, provides a world of statistical information that can help you manage and plan for your site better. Your site data is collected on a daily basis and is displayed against data for your site over the past month.

The data collected is just amazing. For starters, on the first screen, the Dashboard, you can see an overview chart of the month with numbers of visits, pageviews, and pages per visit, bounce rate, average time on the site, and percentage of new visits. Also there’s a visitors overview chart with numbers of visitors, a world chart showing where your visitors are coming from, a chart showing traffic sources, and an overview of which pages on your site are most popular.

You can compare statistics with the new Advanced Segments, check your site against the average statistics of sites of your size with Benchmarks, view the search terms that brought readers to your site… the list goes on and on. Each of the (and more) elements on the Dashboard can be drilled down into to discover an incredible amount of information about your site.

Needless to say, Google Analytics is a must-have tool to have! Getting a Google Analytics account is easy to do, and Thesis makes incorporating it into your site a snap.

Setting up Google Analytics

In your browser, go to Google Analytics.

Screen 1: Access Analytics button
Screen 1: Access Analytics button

Screen 1: Press the “Access Analytics” button or sign up for a new account. If you do not have a Google account, you will be lead through the steps of creating one. If you already have a Google Analytics account, choose “Create New Account” from the pulldown on the upper right.

Screen 2: Sign Up for Google Analytics button
Screen 2: Sign Up for Google Analytics button

Screen 2: Click the “Sign Up for Google Analytics” button.

Screen 3: Signup for site URL, etc.
Screen 3: Signup for site URL, etc.

Screen 3: Fill in your site’s URL, name the account, choose a country and time zone. Click continue.

Screen 4: Your name, phone number, country
Screen 4: Your name, phone number, country

Screen 4: Fill in your name, phone number, and country. Click continue.

Screen 5: Read and agree to terms of service.

Screen 6: Copy the tracking code
Screen 6: Copy the tracking code

Screen 6: Copy the tracking code. I suggest you create a document and save this tracking code in case you ever need to access it again. Click continue.

Screen 7: Overview
Screen 7: Overview

Screen 7: If everything’s ok, you should see the Overview Screen.

Putting the tracking code into your footer scripts: Without a plugin

Enter the tracking code into Footer Scripts
Enter the tracking code into Footer Scripts

The Google Analytics script you copied on screen 6 above needs to go into the footer in every screen. With Thesis, it’s easy to set this up:
1. From the Admin Panel, go to Appearance, then Thesis Options
2. In the left hand column find “Stats Software and Scripts” then “Footer Scripts”
3. Paste the tracking code here and save.

Putting the tracking code into your footer scripts: Using the Google Analytics for WordPress plugin

Enter your Analytics ID
Enter your Analytics ID

1. Note the Analytics number assigned to you in the overview screen (screen 7, above). It starts with a “UA-“. It will also be in the tracking code you copied in the line:

 var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-0000000-1");

2. From the Admin Panel, go to Plugins, then click on Google Analytics
3. Paste your Analytics ID into the “Analytics Account ID” box, then update settings.

And finally…

Remember that it takes time to build up Google Analytics history. Your first overview screen will show no visits, no matter how popular your site is. The Google Analytics data for your site is updated once a day, so today’s data will be shown tomorrow and kept for a month.

There are lots of places to learn how to use Google Analytics data. Start with the official Google Analytics Help page. Measuring Success has a great page with links to many Analytics learning sites. And then there’s always Google search itself, which shows thousands of pages for the search terms “Google Analytics Help.”

I hope this article has been clear and easy to follow. Please feel free to leave a comment, or to email me using the “Contact” tab.

©2009 Thesis Theme Tools. All rights reserved.

What next?

Your comments are always welcome, and are important to this blog’s community! Leave a comment now, or read the comments.

You can find several related articles in the “Related Articles” list below. In the footer you will find a lists of Popular Posts, Recent Posts, and you may browse by Categories, or tags. There’s also a Google Custom Search box to help you find just what you want.

Get free updates by RSS or email!

If you have enjoyed this article, please consider subscribing to article updates, using an RSS reader, or by email. It’s free and is a great way to make sure you don’t miss a single article! I also invite you to follow me on Twitter!

Why not share this article with others!

Share this article with your friends using your favorite social media service, such as StumbleUpon, or Digg. Check out the icons below under “Share This Article With Others” for other social media, including del.icio.us, Technorati, Sphinn, Friendfeed, FaceBook, MySpace andLinkedIn! You can also email or print the article, and even tweet it using Twitter!

Landing Page

If you have reached this site from Anxiety, Panic & Health, you may be a little dismayed at what you have found! The Thesis theme for WordPress is the software I use to make these blogs appear as they do. It has nothing to do with Anxiety Disorders, and everything to do with the nuts-and-bolts behind what you see on the screen. I have linked here from Anxiety, Panic & Health because I have received many questions about how I use the Thesis theme from its readers.

Besides being vitally interested in mental health topics, and the Anxiety Disorders in particular, I have a deep interest in the Thesis theme for WordPress, participating frequently in the community at the DIYthemes Forums, and actively developing solutions for it. This interest has led me to create Thesis Theme Tools. I hope you take a moment to read more about this great piece of software!

15 reasons Why Thesis Is the World’s Best WordPress Theme

This site is all about the Thesis theme for WordPress from DIYthemes. It is more than the typical fanboi site that is built on a shaky foundation and is here today and obsolete tomorrow. I would not waste my time if it were.

The Thesis theme is an established and rapidly growing product, one that is destined to have staying power in the world of WordPress themes for years to come. It has thousands of users and its user base is growing every day.

Thesis Theme Tools is meant to be a central repository of information about the Thesis theme that you can’t find anywhere else, organized in a manner that is readily accessible to every level of user. It is not meant to duplicate or compete with other great sites, such as the DIYthemes Answers site. Instead, it offers how-to’s, analyses, instructions, and resources that are unique, or often so spread about the internet that they’re hard to find. Many of the articles here arise from frequent questions on the DIYthemes Forums, and are presented in hopes that users will find a ready and complete solution to their problems on this site.

I believe that the Thesis theme for WordPress is the best available by far, whether free or paid. Why is this so?

Here’s the first 15 reasons why Thesis is the world’s best WordPress theme:

  1. Out of the box, Thesis can be customized rapidly and radically by just clicking a few boxes and changing a few numbers on the Thesis Options and Design Options pages. All without a line of code! Those wishing to further customize Thesis have a robust and easy-to-use framework to work with, without all the confusion of editing a multitude of core files.
  2. Thesis has a world-class forum where you can get troubleshooting support and learn how to customize the theme. And I do mean world-class: Its response time is generally on a par with telephone support, and goes into much greater depth than telephone support can offer. Searching the forum’s thousands of threads often gets you the answer you need in just minutes. And Thesis’ forum provides a world of cut-and-paste modifications — from simple to very complex. You don’t need to know how to program css or php to get a unique-looking site!
  3. http://diythemes.com/forums/
  4. Thesis is being actively developed. Chris Pearson, Thesis’ lead developer, keeps bringing new features to Thesis with every update. And the updates are frequent: I started with version 1.0.2, and in just 11 months, it has gone on to version 1.5.1.
  5. Access to the Thesis theme’s upgrades and forums are for life — no upgrade fees, no restrictions.
  6. Thesis is “upgrade-proof.” You make all your modifications in two files within a custom folder, and never touch the core files. That means that when there is an upgrade, all you have to do is transfer your custom folder and your modifications are there.
  7. The Thesis framework is rock-solid, and is built with the foresight and imagination that makes it an ideal platform for any kind of customizations you want. Thesis can be made to look the way you want it to. Just look at the sites in the Thesis showcase: not one of them looks like “Thesis,” yet they all take advantage of its robust underlying framework.
  8. Thesis’ system of hooks and filters gives you unprecedented control over every element on the page. You can move virtually anything anywhere, modify the appearance and actions of almost every element, and place your own objects anywhere on the page. And that’s just to start with!
  9. Thesis speeds up development. Witness godhammer’s setup of a complete site in less than five hours. What would take days to accomplish with other themes takes only hours with Thesis.
  10. Thesis’ learning curve is much less steep than for other themes, and what you learn remains valid with each upgrade. For example, Thesis has had its hooks system since version 1.2. Each new version has added new hooks, but you don’t have to relearn the hook system — just add onto it. Thesis introduced filters in version 1.5.1, and each new version will have more to work with. Once you get your head around how they work, you will never have to relearn how Thesis filters function.
  11. Thesis is optimized for speed and efficiency. It loads far faster than most themes, even when burdened by many plugins, widgets, and images. Check out this article for how it’s done.
  12. http://diythemes.com/thesis/efficiency/
  13. Thesis has the greatest implementation of SEO of any theme available, free or paid. You don’t need a bunch of SEO plugins to rank high in Google search results. But if you have been using All-in-One-SEO, Thesis will either let you keep using it, or convert your settings over to “Thesis-friendly” ones.
  14. Thesis is built with accessibility in mind. Your ability to reach different audiences -— those with special needs, people using alternative Web browsers, mobile users — is built into the Thesis framework, rather than tacked on, as in other themes.
  15. Users have a real voice in new features added to Thesis. The DIYthemes Forums have an active “Feature Request” section that is watched closely by the developers, and is the source for many of the improvements to the theme.

These are just some of the reasons why Thesis is so far superior to other WordPress themes. I could have gone on, but I think 15 reasons are enough!

I hope you enjoy Thesis Theme Tools, and find it a useful aid to your exploration and exploitation of the Thesis theme! Please feel free to make suggestions for topics either in article comments or by using the “Contact” tab to email me directly.